Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Untitled Document

Blogging Is a Blast: Classroom Blogging

Learn the basics of beginning a blog

Why?

Why blog with students?

Caitlin Tucker includes some great reasons to blog with students.  In one of her blog posts, she says she has students blog to:

  • creative a positive digital footprint
  • use media strategically to communicate information visually
  • cite media that was created by others
  • take pictures and learn basic photo editing
  • produce well written blogs
  • capture audience attention and readership 

Blogging can meet many Common Core Standards!

Resources

Ideas for Classroom Use

Student Blogging Activities that Don't Rely on Text by Richard Bryne

How to Set Yourself Up for Blogging Success by Richard Bryne

Current Events Blog by Honors Comprehensive American Studies II - block 4

Philosophy Blog by Stephen Goyette

German Class Blog by Karen Cox

Common Core Connections

Common Core Standards for Writing:  

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.