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Elementary Report Cards: Definitions

Elementary Report Cards

What do the scores represent on the report card?

Select the score below for more details...

(E) - Exceeding Expectations

What is “Exceeding Expectations”?

A student is “Exceeding Expectations” when he/she/they is/are consistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards above his/her/their grade-level.  Their understanding could represent all or part of the above grade-level standard; “exceeding” means above grade-level to any extent.      

Relatedly, “Exceeding Expectations” is not necessarily the equivalent of an “A” on a traditional report card.  For example, if a 4th grade student received “A’s” on every assessment during the marking period, he/she/they would probably receive an “A” on a traditional report card.  If those math assessments measured only the concepts and skills that are described by the 4th grade math standards, those “A’s” would be the equivalent of “Meeting Expectations” on this report card.  In other words, the student is doing what he/she/they is expected to do, very well, but not more. 

(M) - Meeting Expectations

What is “Meeting Expectations”?

A student is “Meeting Expectations” when he/she/they is/are consistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards at his/her/their grade-level.

(P) - Progressing Toward

What is “Progressing Toward”?

A student is “Progressing Toward” grade-level expectations when he/she/they is/are: 

  • inconsistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards at his/her/their grade-level or,
  • consistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards one grade-level below his/her/their grade-level.

(B) - Beginning to Progress

What is “Beginning to Progress”?

A student is “Beginning to Progress” towards grade-level expectations when he/she/they is/are: 

  • inconsistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards one grade-level below his/her/their grade-level or,
  • consistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards two or more grade-levels below his/her/their grade-level.

(N/A) - Insufficient Evidence

“N/A” should be entered whenever there is not enough evidence to make a valid and representative score rating for a learning expectation.  For example:

  • If a learning expectation is not taught during the reporting period, then “N/A” should be entered.
  • If a reporting period ends in the middle of a unit or module before a substantive body of evidence has been collected to illustrate a student’s current understanding of concepts or ability to apply skills, then “N/A” should be entered.
  • If a student has been excessively absent and there is not a sufficient body of evidence to evaluate, then “N/A” should be entered.

If a student is scored at “P” in Trimester 1, can that student be scored “N/A” in Trimester 2?

Yes.  If a learning expectation is not assessed during a trimester, “N/A” should be used, even if that learning expectation was assessed in a previous trimester.  Carrying the initial score forward implies there was an opportunity to demonstrate growth and be evaluated on that growth, when in fact, that may not be the case. 

What happens if a student regresses in a skill in the next trimester?  Do you leave "M" in place or go back to "P"?

A student is “Meeting Expectations” when he/she/they is/are consistently demonstrating an understanding of the standards at his/her/their grade-level.  Because we are reporting out on end-of-year learning expectations that do not increase in complexity over time, a regression to inconsistently demonstrating an understanding of grade-level standards (including needing assistance to demonstrate that understanding), should not occur.